When Did It Become Normal To Pay For A Closed Beta

Back in the day getting access to a game in closed beta used to be free. It was hard, but free. Now we have founders packs that cost as much as $300 that gives us a bunch of side content along with closed beta access to whatever ever game we’re trying to get into. 

When did this become the norm? I think the better question is why are we allowing it to happen? Why pay so much money to play a game that’s not even 50% finished? Why not demand a free demo? Back in the day demos were very common and guess what… they were free!

Blade_&_Soul_NA_debut[1]Blade and Soul, the upcoming martial arts MMO, is following this trend. I loved the game when I played it a few years ago. The ping was horrible because I don’t live in Korea, but I had a lot of fun learning the controls, language, and different character classes. I knew it would come to the west one day and that time will come soon.

If you want access to the closed beta you’ll have to purchase a founders pack. The cheapest pack is $24.99 while the most expensive pack is $124.99. That’s a huge gap in price.

I don’t agree with these business practices because they usually don’t benefit anyone, but the developer. Look at what happened with Archeage. Everyone was so excited for it to be released that it bombed and lost a good chunk of it’s players because it didn’t give everyone what the devs promised us.

I personally love the game, but I didn’t buy a founders pack because I knew the core game itself would be free. I’m going to do the same thing with Blade and Soul because it’s going to be a free MMO. I can’t be the only person that feels this way about this.

How are things ever going to change if no one takes the first step in making it happen?

Advertisements

Author: Drakulus

I'm a hardcore gamer that enjoys every type of genre there is. I'm also a father of four kids, two girls and two boys, and love to write about whatever pops into my head.

6 thoughts on “When Did It Become Normal To Pay For A Closed Beta”

  1. I’ve fallen into the trap before both because I’m so desperate for something new, something different that I overlook the issues and also because I mistakenly believe my inpu during those times matter

    Well, not anymore. I ain’t doing it anymore .. maybe… help me =p

  2. I remember a day when being a Beta Tester was a dream job and that you’d be paid by them in some cases. Now Devs on Steam think you can put price tags and microtransactions on them instead, not to mention a great deal of them don’t even try to improve their games.

    My belief is as soon as something costs money or has paid content (e.g. microtransactions) it can (and should be) judged at the level of a full game no matter what stage its actually at.

  3. Gamers seem to have more money than sense. Over the years we have seen the community gladly pay for over priced costumes, DLC which is just content removed from the main game and cash to test a demo. I’m not sure how many more pre-orders for broken games need to be paid before everyone wakes up.

    1. You’re right. Even though I could afford to pay for whatever game I want doesn’t mean I’m going to.

      Mad Max proved that a game can work flawlessly on day one. There were no game breaking bugs, or anything like that. Other developers should release games like that, but they’re not because they simply don’t care.

      I will never pay to play an unfinished profuct. Closed beta testing used to be free and now it’s not anymore. Early Access games used to be demos and they’re not anymore. Game developers have gotten really greedy and will do anything to keep the cash flowing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s